Lorenzo


Gender: Masculine

Origin: Latin

Meaning: “Man from Laurentum.”

Pronunciation: (loh-REN-zoh)

Nicknames: Lozo, Enzo, Renzo, Lenzo

Detail: Italian and Spanish form of Laurentius, which meant “from Laurentum”, its name probably deriving from Latin laurus “laurel”.

Saint Laurence was a 3rd-century deacon and martyr from Rome.

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England (in a variety of spellings), partly because of a second saint by this name, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury.

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Arlo


The Half Holiday, Alec home from school by Elizabeth Adela Stanhope Forbes

Gender: Masculine

Origin: English / Spanish / Germanic

Meaning: “A man, barberry tree, fortified hill.”

Pronunciation: (AR-loh)

Nicknames: Ar, Arl, Lo

Detail: There are several origins of the name:
An Italian variant of the German Charles meaning “man”
The Spanish word for the “barberry tree”
An Old English variant of Harlow, derived from the Anglo-Saxon words here and hlaw meaning “army hill”

Mafalda


Gender: Feminine

Origin: Germanic

Meaning: “Mighty in battle.”

Pronunciation: (mah-FAHL-dah)

Nicknames: Maffy, Mafa

Detail: Mafalda is a Spanish and Italian variant form of Matilda, from the Germanic maht “strength” and hild “battle”.

In Rowling’s Harry Potter Mafalda Hopkirk is an improper Use of Magic Office employee at the Ministry of Magic.

Francesca


Paolo and Francesca by Charles Edward Halle

Gender: Feminine

Origin: Latin

Meaning: “From France.”

Pronunciation: (frahn-CHES-kah)

Nicknames: Cesca, Cesi, Chess, Frankie

Detail: Francesca (and Paolo) were historical contemporaries of Dante Alighieri.

Francesca was blatantly tricked into marrying Gianciotto, who was disfigured and uncouth, when the handsome and elegant Paolo (Gianciotto’s brother) was sent in his brother’s place to settle the nuptial contract. Angered at finding herself wed the following day to Gianciotto, Francesca made no attempt to restrain her affections for Paolo and the two in fact soon became lovers. Informed of this liaison, Gianciotto one day caught them together in Francesca’s bedroom (unaware that Paolo got stuck in his attempt to escape down a ladder, she let Gianciotto in the room); when Gianciotto lunged at Paolo with a sword, Francesca stepped between the two men and was killed instead, much to the dismay of her husband, who then promptly finished off Paolo as well.