Holden


Gender: Masculine

Origin: English

Meaning: “Deep valley.”

Pronunciation: (HOLE-den)

Nicknames: Hold

Detail: Holden is an English surname which was first taken from the same English place name. It is made up of the Old English elements hol “deep, hollow” and denu “valley”.

Holden Caulfield was the main character in the novel The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger.

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Foster


Gender: Masculine

Origin: English

Meaning: “Forest; keeper of the forest.”

Pronunciation: (FAWS-ter)

Nicknames: Fos, Foz

Detail: Derived from Middle English occupational words referring to a forester, scissor maker, or woodworker.

Neva


March Snow (1904) by Igor Grabar

Gender: Feminine

Origin: Latin; Old English; French

Meaning: “Snow, new, juniper tree.”

Pronunciation: (NEE-vah)

Nicknames: Neve

Detail: Neva is derived from the Latin word neve meaning “snow”.

A different derivation of Neva is from the Old English word neowe which means “new”

Another origin of Neva is from the Old French Geneva meaning “juniper tree”

Arlo


The Half Holiday, Alec home from school by Elizabeth Adela Stanhope Forbes

Gender: Masculine

Origin: English / Spanish / Germanic

Meaning: “A man, barberry tree, fortified hill.”

Pronunciation: (AR-loh)

Nicknames: Ar, Arl, Lo

Detail: There are several origins of the name:
An Italian variant of the German Charles meaning “man”
The Spanish word for the “barberry tree”
An Old English variant of Harlow, derived from the Anglo-Saxon words here and hlaw meaning “army hill”

Frigga


Gender: Feminine

Origin: Norse

Meaning: “Beloved lady; to love.”

Detail: Old Norse Frigg, Old Saxon Fri, and Old English Frig are derived from Germanic Frijjō. The root also appears in Old Saxon fri which means “beloved lady”, in Swedish as fria “to propose for marriage” and in Icelandic as frjá which means “to love.”

TGIF TFIF (Thank Frigg It’s Friday!) 😉

Yes, Friday came from the Old English frīgedæg, meaning the day of Frigg. In most Germanic languages the day is named after Freyja, such as Frīatag (Old High German), Freitag (Modern German), Freyjudagr (Old Norse), Vrijdag (Dutch), Fredag (Swedish, Norwegian, and Danish)—but Freyja and Frigg are frequently identified with each other.

Frigg is a major Norse goddess, queen of Asgard (Norse God Headquarters). Frigg appears mainly in mythological stories as wife of Odin and a mother of Baldur. She is also has the power of foresight, yet she never reveals what she knows to anyone.

Eowyn


Gender: Feminine

Origin: English / Tolkien

Meaning: “Delightful charger; horse lover.”

Pronunciation: The first syllable of Eowyn sounds like “eh-ah,” with the “ah” just barely pronounced. The y in the second syllable is the same sound as the German letter ü or the French u.

(eh-ah-weun) [French u]

In the films it is pronounced (EY-oh-win)

Nicknames: Eo, Wyn

Detail: J.R.R. Tolkien created the name Eowyn using elements from Old English. In the Old English language the word eoh (or eh) means “war-horse, charger” while wyn means “delight, pleasure.”