Fenrir


Gender: Masculine

Origin: Old Norse

Pronunciation: (FEHN-rir)

Nicknames: Fen, Fenno

Detail: The meaning Fenrir is disputed on is thought to be the Old Norse “fen-dweller”. Another idea is the short form of Fenrisúlfr. Which means “Fenris-wolf”, derived from the name Fenris combined with Old Norse úlfr “wolf.” The etymology of the name Fenris is uncertain; it is thought that it is derived from Old Norse fen “moor, marsh, swamp” and Old Norse hris “brushwood, shrub.”

In Norse mythology, Fenrir is a monstrous wolf and is foretold to kill the god Odin during the events of Ragnarök (the end of the world).

J. K. Rowling also uses the name for one of her werewolf characters, Fenrir Greyback, in the popular Harry Potter series.

Arnulf


Gender: Masculine

Origin: Norse

Meaning: “Eagle wolf.”

Pronunciation: (AHR-nulf)

Nicknames: Arno, Arn, Arnie, Rulf, Uffe

Detail: From the Old High German arn, “eagle” and the Old Norse ulfr, “wolf”.

Freyja


Gender: Feminine

Origin: Norse

Meaning: “Lady.”

Pronunciation: (FREY-yah)

Nicknames: Frey, Fay, Reya, Ray

Detail: Freyja is a goddess in Norse mythology associated with love, beauty, fertility, gold, seiðr (witchcraft), war, and death.

In most Germanic languages the day is named after Freyja, such as Frīatag (Old High German), Freitag (Modern German), Freyjudagr (Old Norse), Vrijdag (Dutch), Fredag (Swedish, Norwegian, and Danish)

Variations:

  • Freia
  • Freja
  • Freya
  • Freyja

Finn


Gender: Masculine

Origin: Old Norse

Meaning: “Fair; Wanderer.”

Pronunciation: (fin)

Detail: Huckleberry Finn is the title character of the Mark Twain novel Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

In the Prose Edda, Finn is of the lineage of Thor.

Male Variations:

  • Finn
  • Finnr (Old Norse)
  • Finnur
  • Fionn (Gaelic)

Female Variations:

  • Finn
  • Finna