Idunn


Idun by Arthur Rackham

Gender: Feminine

Origin: Norse

Meaning: “Ever young; rejuvenator.”

Pronunciation: (EE-doon) [“oo” short like in “book”]

Detail: In Norse mythology Idunn is the goddess of spring and wife of Bragi. She is the keeper of the apples of the gods. Whoever eats of these apples will be granted eternal life and youth.

Variations:

  • Idonea
  • Idonia
  • Idony (ID-uh-nee)
  • Idun
  • Idunn
  • Ithun (EE-thoon)
  • Ydun
Advertisements

Apolline


Saint Apollonia by James Christensen

Gender: Feminine

Origin: Greek

Meaning: “Strength; to destroy.”

Pronunciation: Eng (ap-oll-LINE); Fre (ap-oll-EEN)

Detail: St. Apollonia was martyred for not renouncing her faith during the reign of Emperor Philip. Apollonia had all her teeth knocked out after being hit in the face by a Christian persecutor under the reign of Emperor Philip. After she was threatened with fire unless she renounced her faith, Apollonia jumped into the flames voluntarily. She is considered the patron of dental diseases and is often invoked by those with toothaches. Ancient art depicts her with a golden tooth at the end of her necklace. Also in art, she is seen with pincers holding a tooth.

Apolline was the mother of Fleur Delacour in the Harry Potter series.

In Greek mythology, Apollo was the great Olympian god of prophecy and oracles, healing, plague and disease, music, song and poetry, archery, and the protection of the young. Later he also became the god of the sun and light. Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto and the twin of Artemis.

Nicknames: Apple, Lena, Lona, Polly

Variations:

  • Abelone (Scandinavian)
  • Apolena (Czech and Slavic)
  • Apolline (French)
  • Apolonia (Polish)
  • Apolonija (Slavic)
  • Lona (German short form)