Pomona


Gender: Feminine

Origin: Latin

Meaning: “Fruit tree.”

Pronunciation: (pah-MOH-nah)

Nicknames: Pomme (French word for apple), Pomy, Poppy, Mona

Detail: From the Latin pomus “fruit tree”. This was the name of the Roman goddess of fruit trees.

In the Harry Potter series Pomona Sprout the professor of Herbology.

Eustace


Gender: Masculine

Origin: Greek

Meaning: “Rich of corn, fruitful; steadfast.”

Pronunciation: (YOO-stus)

Nicknames: Euso, Eui, Eusie

Detail: Saint Eustace was a 2nd-century martyr, a Roman general who became a Christian after seeing a vision of a cross between the antlers of a stag he was hunting. He was burned to death for refusing to worship the Roman gods and is now regarded as the patron saint of hunters. Due to him, this name was common in England during the Middle Ages, though it is presently rare.

Feminine form is Eustacia (yoo-STAY-shah).

Olallie


Gender: Feminine

Origin: Chinook (A Native American people inhabiting the Pacific Northwest)

Meaning: “Berries.”

Pronunciation: (oh-LAH-leh); (oh-LAH-lee)

Nicknames: Olla, Olli, Lali, Lala

Detail: The Olallieberry is grown mainly on the Northwest Coast of the United States and Canada. This cross between a Youngberry and a Loganberry has a distinctive, sweet flavor and resembles a large, elongated Blackberry. It’s delicious both fresh and cooked and makes excellent jams and jellies.

Variations:

  • Olalla
  • Olallie

Huckleberry


Gender: Masculine

Origin: American

Meaning: “Humble.”

Pronunciation: (HUHK-uhl-ber-ee)

Nicknames: Huck

Detail: Both in agriculture and in the American vocabulary, the huckleberry has been humble. In 1800s America, huckleberry meant “a small thing.”

Huckleberry was chosen for the title role in one of the most well-known American novels, Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

“We said there warn’t no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don’t. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft.”

Onatah


Gender: Feminine

Origin: Iroquois

Meaning: “Daughter of the Earth and Corn Spirit.”

Pronunciation: (oh-NAH-tah)

Nicknames: Nat, Ona, Ota

Detail: In Iroquois mythology, Onatah is the corn goddess. She was the daughter of Eithinoha (Mother Earth).

Onatah was kidnapped by the ruler of the underworld. Her mother searched everywhere for her, to no avail. She grieved and while she grieved no crops grew. Finally, the sun found where she was, split open the ground and rescued her, and the earth flourished. However, the spirits of the underworld miss Onatah, and whenever the sun sleeps they snatch her back (winter), and then a great human effort in ceremonies and offerings are needed to awaken the sun and rescue her again (spring).

Idunn


Idun by Arthur Rackham

Gender: Feminine

Origin: Norse

Meaning: “Ever young; rejuvenator.”

Pronunciation: (EE-doon) [“oo” short like in “book”]

Detail: In Norse mythology Idunn is the goddess of spring and wife of Bragi. She is the keeper of the apples of the gods. Whoever eats of these apples will be granted eternal life and youth.

Variations:

  • Idonea
  • Idonia
  • Idony (ID-uh-nee)
  • Idun
  • Idunn
  • Ithun (EE-thoon)
  • Ydun