Fenrir


Gender: Masculine

Origin: Old Norse

Pronunciation: (FEHN-rir)

Nicknames: Fen, Fenno

Detail: The meaning Fenrir is disputed on is thought to be the Old Norse “fen-dweller”. Another idea is the short form of Fenrisúlfr. Which means “Fenris-wolf”, derived from the name Fenris combined with Old Norse úlfr “wolf.” The etymology of the name Fenris is uncertain; it is thought that it is derived from Old Norse fen “moor, marsh, swamp” and Old Norse hris “brushwood, shrub.”

In Norse mythology, Fenrir is a monstrous wolf and is foretold to kill the god Odin during the events of Ragnarök (the end of the world).

J. K. Rowling also uses the name for one of her werewolf characters, Fenrir Greyback, in the popular Harry Potter series.

Arolilja


Gender: Feminine

Origin: Finnish

Meaning: “Lily of the steppes.”

Pronunciation: (ar-oh-LEEL-yah)

Nicknames: Aro, Ari, Lilja, Lila, Lily

Detail: From the combination of aro meaning “steppes” (steppes are large areas of flat grassy land where there are no trees), and lilja meaning “lily”.

In a medieval, Norwegian ballad, Bendik falls in love with princess Arolilja. A boy tells the king that Bendik is seeing his daughter. Bendik’s punishment is death. Arolilja prays for him to no avail, he is hanged. She dies of heartache, and the king grieves. The two are buried on either side of a church, and up from their graves lilies grow and entwine above the church roof.

Ondine


Gender: Feminine

Origin: Latin

Meaning: “Wave; water spirit.”

Pronunciation: (OHN-deen)

Nicknames: Onni, Ondi, Odie

Detail: Ondine was a water nymph in German mythology. Ondines or undines are also elementals, enumerated as the water elementals in works of alchemy by Paracelsus.

Variations:

  • Undine [un-DEEN]

Did anyone else enjoy the movie Ondine? It is about the story of an Irish fisherman who discovers a woman in his fishing net who he believes to be a mermaid.

Sive


Midsummer Eve by Edward Hughes

Gender: Feminine

Origin: Gaelic

Meaning: “Sweet; goodness.”

Pronunciation: (shee-vah); (SAHYV)

Detail: According to Irish mythology, Sive refuses the advances of the Druid Fear Doirche who then casts a spell on her making her take the form of a deer. Sive is rescued by Fionn mac Cumhail (fyun) and discovers that spell is broken while under Fionn‘s protection. They have a son (Oisin (uh-SHEEN)) together but eventually Sive is tricked into leaving Fionn‘s house and is turned back into a deer.

Variations:

  • Saibh
  • Saidhbh
  • Sive