Alf


Gender: Masculine

Origin: Norse

Meaning: “Elf.”

Pronunciation: (ALF)

Nicknames: Alfie

Detail: Derived from Old Norse alfr “elf”.

In Norse mythology, King Alf was the suitor of Alfhild. She dressed as a man to avoid marrying him. Then, he thinking she was a warrior, they battled almost to the death. Realizing he was as strong as she was, Alfhild married him.

Male Variations:

  • Alf (Scandinavian, Norse Mythology)
  • Alfr (Old Norse)
  • Alv (Norwegian)

Female Variations:

  • Alfhild
  • Alva (Norwegian, Swedish)
  • Elfa (Norse, Icelandic)
  • Elva (Danish, Swedish)

Amadeus


Gender: Masculine

Origin: Latin

Meaning: “Love of God.”

Pronunciation: (ahm-uh-DAY-us)

Nicknames: Amo, Amadeo, Deo

Detail: Derived from Latin amare “to love” and Deus “God”.

A famous bearer was the Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

 

1 True Love refers to God

Annevieve


Gender: Feminine

Origin: Hebrew / Gaulish

Meaning: “Graceful woman.”

Pronunciation: (AN-uh-veev)

Nicknames: Anne, Vivi, Neve, Nevi

Details: Combination of Anne names and Genevieve. Anne being derived from the Hebrew name Channah which meant “favour” or “grace”; and Genevieve from Genovefa, a Gaulish name possibly meaning “tribe woman”.

Adolf


Gender: Masculine

Origin: Germanic

Meaning: “Noble Wolf.”

Pronunciation: (AH-dawlf)

Nicknames: Ado, Dolf, Alf, Alfie

Detail: From the Germanic name Adalwolf, which meant “noble wolf” from the Germanic elements adal “noble” and wulf.

Male Variations:

  • Aadolf (Finnish)
  • Aadolf (Finnish)
  • Aatoli  (Finnish)
  • Aatolppi (Finnish)
  • Aatoltti (Finnish)
  • Aatolvi (Finnish)
  • Aatovi (Finnish)
  • Aatto (Finnish)
  • Aatu (Finnish)
  • Adalwolf (Ancient Germanic)
  • Ádo (Sami)
  • Adolf  (German, Dutch, Scandinavian, Czech, Ancient Germanic)
  • Adolfe (Danish)
  • Adolfito (Spanish)
  • Adolfo (Italian, Spanish)
  • Adolph (English)
  • Adolphe (French)
  • Adolphus (Ancient Germanic (Latinized))
  • Alef (Swedish)
  • Aleph (Swedish)
  • Alf (Scandinavian)
  • Doffen (Norwegian)
  • Dölf (Limburgish)
  • Dolf (Swedish)
  • Dolph (English)
  • Dolph (Swedish)
  • Dulf (Limburgish)
  • Fito (Spanish)
  • Tolhvi (Finnish)
  • Tolkki (Finnish)
  • Tolppi (Finnish)
  • Tolppo (Finnish)
  • Tolvi (Finnish)

Female Variations:

  • Aadolfiia  (Finnish)
  • Aadolfiina (Finnish)
  • Aatohviina (Finnish)
  • Aatolva (Finnish)
  • Aatolviina (Finnish)
  • Adolfa (English)
  • Adolfina (Finnish, Swedish)
  • Adolfine (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Adolpha (English)
  • Alfiina (Finnish)
  • Alviina (Finnish)
  • Atofiina (Finnish)
  • Atohviina (Finnish)
  • Tolviina (Finnish)
  • Viina (Finnish)
  • Viinu (Finnish)

Is Adolf forever off limits? Middle name? How about his variations? How strongly do you feel about this name?

I think he is very handsome, however some people have gone as far to say that they would “doubt the morality of such a person” who would bear this name onto a child. I find this a bit on the extreme side.

Will this forever be my tainted love?

Argus


Gender: Masculine

Origin: Greek

Meaning: “Glistening, shining.”

Pronunciation: (AHR-gus)

Nicknames: Ar, Argo, Gus

Detail: Derived from the Greek argos meaning “glistening, shining”.

In Greek myth this name belonged to both the man who built the Argo and a man with a hundred eyes.

In the Harry Potter series Argus Filch is the caretaker of Hogwarts School.

Avitus


Gender: Masculine

Origin: Latin

Meaning: “Ancestral.”

Pronunciation: (ah-VEE-tus)

Nicknames: Avo, Vito

Detail: From a Roman family name which meant “ancestral” in Latin. This was the name of an emperor who briefly reigned over the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century.

It was also the name of several saints, including a 6th-century bishop of Vienne.

Arolilja


Gender: Feminine

Origin: Finnish

Meaning: “Lily of the steppes.”

Pronunciation: (ar-oh-LEEL-yah)

Nicknames: Aro, Ari, Lilja, Lila, Lily

Detail: From the combination of aro meaning “steppes” (steppes are large areas of flat grassy land where there are no trees), and lilja meaning “lily”.

In a medieval, Norwegian ballad, Bendik falls in love with princess Arolilja. A boy tells the king that Bendik is seeing his daughter. Bendik’s punishment is death. Arolilja prays for him to no avail, he is hanged. She dies of heartache, and the king grieves. The two are buried on either side of a church, and up from their graves lilies grow and entwine above the church roof.

Arizona


Gender: Feminine

Origin: Pima (Native American); Basque

Meaning: “Having a little spring; or good oak.”

Pronunciation: (air-ih-ZOH-nuh)

Nicknames: Ari, Ara, Azza, Zona, Zoni, Zoe

Detail: Arizona was inherited from the Spanish Arizonac, a word virtually identical to Basque arizonac “good oak”. However, it isn’t clear why the Spanish would choose a Basque word for (at the time) a Mexican territory. The name of this state is most probably a Native American word, possibly an O’odham (Pima) word meaning “having a little spring” made up of ali “little” + sona-g “spring-having”—plus a little corruption from the Spanish.

Alaska


Gender: Feminine

Origin: Aleut

Meaning: “The mainland, the land facing the sea.”

Pronunciation: (uh-LAS-uh)

Nicknames: Alla, Alas, Laski

Detail: Alaska came from an Aleut (Yupik) word alaxsxaq (ah-LOCK-shock) “the mainland, the land facing the sea”. The Russians were the first Europeans in Alaska and they pronounced the word (al-YA-ska). When the US purchased Alaska from the Russians the name was only slightly modified to what it is today.

Title character in John Green’s Looking for Alaska.